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Posted by on Aug 30, 2014 in Ailments, Ailments G-M, Herbs, Herbs G-M | 0 comments

Celery Seed Tea-Gout & Kidney Stones

At least once a day, three days a week, take Celery seed tea prepared by pouring a pint of boiling water over a tablespoonful of Celery seeds (freshly ground or cut) and allowing it to steep.  Let it cool, then strain and drink.  If practical, the tea should be made fresh for each use.

It is very potent in case of Kidney Stones, and chronic kidney diseases.

Celery_Seed_large

Celery  seeds have a direct action on the kidneys, increasing the elimination of water and speeding up the clearance of accumulated toxins from the joints and so is of benefit in any oedematous condition that accompanies arthritis. It  is often administered with Taraxacum radix (Dandalion) to increase the efficiency of elimination by both the kidneys and the liver. Apium is also hypoglycaemic, and as such is helpful in diabetes; this action seems to involve a direct action on the pancreas and its production of insulin. Clinical studies in China have demonstrated a hypotensive action for the tincture, and this is accompanied by increased urine output. The flavonoid apigenin has exhibited significant anti-platelet activity in vitro.

Celery seeds are very helpful for people suffering from an over supply of uric acid. Celery has large amounts of potassium and organic sodium that help to rid the body of waste material by stimulating various sites such as the skin, bowels and kidneys. It re-balances the acid/alkaline in the system and may help prevent certain cancers.

Celery Seed is known as a mild diuretic and urinary antiseptic and has been used in the treatment of urinary stones – calculi. It has a calming effect on the gut, and can be used in the relief of flatulence and griping pains. However, whilst it can reduce visceral spasm, it conversely stimulates the smooth muscle of the womb and can bring on delayed menstruation. After childbirth it helps the uterus readjust and encourages the flow of breast milk. The phthalides are the constituents responsible for the antispasmodic, sedative and diuretic actions. Apium has a direct action on the kidneys, increasing the elimination of water and speeding up the clearance of accumulated toxins from the joints and so is of benefit in any oedematous condition that accompanies arthritis. It  is often administered with Taraxacum radix (Dandalion) to increase the efficiency of elimination by both the kidneys and the liver. Apium is also hypoglycaemic, and as such is helpful in diabetes; this action seems to involve a direct action on the pancreas and its production of insulin. Clinical studies in China have demonstrated a hypotensive action for the tincture, and this is accompanied by increased urine output. The flavonoid apigenin has exhibited significant anti-platelet activity in vitro.

The volatile oil in Apium has been shown to have antifungal activity, and it is active against many bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus albus, Shigella dysenteriae, Salmonella typhi, Streptococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes and Pseudomonas solanacearum. No activity was observed against Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Caution: Celery Seed (Apium)  should be avoided in pregnancy because it is a uterine stimulant. The volatile oil in quantity is toxic to the kidneys and so should not be used in kidney disorders. Allergic reactions are rare.

Additional Comments: In Germany, celery preparations are used to treat loss of appetite loss and exhaustion, and also in the prophylaxis of nervous exhaustion.

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