Pages Menu
Facebook
Categories Menu

Posted by on Nov 23, 2016 in Essential Oils A-F | 0 comments

Cinnamon Bark Essential Oil

Cinnamon Bark Essential Oil

Botanical Name: Cinnamomum zeylanicum or cassia

Common Method of Extraction: Steam Distilled

Part Typically Used: Leaf or Bark

Color: Golden Yellow/Brown

Consistency: Slightly oily feeling

Perfumery Note: Middle

Strength of Initial Aroma: Strong

Cassia should only be used externally due to high eugenol content.

Bark Oil Major Constituents:
(E)-Cinnamaldehyde
Eugenol
(E)-Cinnamyl acetate
Linalool
B-Caryophyllene
p-Cymene

Leaf Oil Major Constituents:
Eugenol
Eugenyl acetate
Linalool
(E)-Cinnamyl acetate
Benzyl benzoate

Aromatic Description: Much richer in aroma than ground cinnamon. (Ground cinnamon and cinnamon sticks is usually not cinnamon at all but is cassia.

Cinnamon Essential Oil is peppery, earthy, spicy, bright yet slightly woodsy. Oil distilled from the bark of the cinnamon tree is preferred over the oil distilled from the leaves. Cinnamon Bark Essential Oil, however, tends to be much more costly.

Description: The cinnamon tree is an evergreen native to China and Vietnam that has since been cultivated in many other regions. It has shiny, leathery green leaves, and small, white flowers with oval shaped purple berries.

Color: Clear yellow to golden yellow liquid.

Consistency: Medium

Aromatic Scent: Cinnamon Bark Oil has a warm, spicy scent that is somewhere between clove and cinnamon. It is slightly herbaceous with pepper notes.

Note: Middle

Strength of Aroma: Strong

Blends well with: Frankincense, Lavender, Cedarwood, Orange, Lemon, Neroli, Ylang-ylang.

Common Uses: The traditional use of Cinnamon Bark Essential Oil is highly respected, because of the antiseptic and antimicrobial properties of the oil. It has been used to treat diarrhea and other problems of the digestive system. With its pleasant scent, it has been considered to be a perfect additive to creams, lotions, and soaps. From a spiritual perspective, it is believed to have a warming and uplifting characteristic.

History: The medicinal use of Cinnamon Bark was first recorded in Chinese formulations as early as 2700 B.C. The herb has been used as a healing aid for stomach upset and gas, diarrhea, rheumatism, kidney ailments, and abdominal pain. The Egyptians used it as a foot massage, as well as a remedy for excessive bile. It was used as an ingredient of mulled wines, love potions and a sedative during birthing.

Cautions: Cinnamon Bark Essential Oil can be irritating to the skin and mucous membranes – particularly in large doses. When using this oil, care must be taken because of the amount of active ingredients (compounds) it contains, and potential side effects from photo toxicity and sensitizing must be kept in mind when treating a client. It should always be used in dilution. Avoid use during pregnancy.

(STEAM DISTILLED OILS)

  • Our Oils are steam distilled & of the highest quality.
  • Your satisfaction of our service & products.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Safety Information: Tisserand and Young indicate that both the bark and the leaf oil are low risk for mucous membrane irritation, may inhibit blood clotting and pose a drug interaction hazard. Cinnamon Bark Oil may cause embryo toxicity and is contraindicated in pregnancy and breasfeeding. There is a high risk of skin sensitization with the bark oil, and Tisserand and Young recommend a dermal maximum of 0.07% for the bark oil. For the leaf oil, Tisserand and Young recommend a dermal maximum of 0.6%.Possible skin sensitivity. If pregnant or under a doctor’s care, consult your physician. Always dilute before applying to the skin or taking internally. Keep out of reach of children.