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Posted by on Nov 24, 2016 in Essential Oils, Essential Oils N-S | 0 comments

Peppermint Essential Oil

Peppermint Essential Oil

The aroma of Peppermint Essential Oil is familiar and pleasant to most. Peppermint Oil is very intense and is far more concentrated than most other steam distilled essential oils. At low dilutions, it is fresh, minty and quite uplifting. Its a favorite around Christmas and the holidays, but is also popular year round.

Peppermint Essential Oil contains menthol. Menthol induces a cooling sensation, and use of Peppermint Oil (at low dilution) in a body mist or even in the diffuser can help to cool you down.

Menthol is also known to help ease tension headaches and muscular aches and pains.

If you find Peppermint Oil to be a bit too intense, you may enjoy working with Spearmint Oil. Often, I substitute Spearmint Essential Oil for some of the Peppermint Essential Oil in a blend, especially for children.

Emotionally, Peppermint Oil is stimulating and is a good choice for inclusion in blends intended to help enhance alertness and stamina. It is considered an aphrodisiac. Peppermint should be avoided before bedtime.

Botanical Name: Mentha piperita

Common Method of Extraction: Steam Distilled

Part Typically Used: Leaves and Flowers/Buds

Color: Clear with a Yellow Tinge

Consistency: Thin

Perfumery Note: Top

Strength of Initial Aroma: Strong

Peppermint Oil Uses: Asthma, colic, exhaustion, flu, flatulence, headache, nausea, scabies, sinusitis, vertigo. May potentially deter rodents.

Major Constituents:
Menthol
Menthone
Menthyl acetate
Neomenthol
1,8-Cineole
Menthofuran

Properties: Analgesic, anesthetic, anti septic, anti galactogogue, anti phlogistic, anti spasmodic, astringent, carminative, cephalic, cholagogue, cordial, decongestant, emenagogue, expectorant, febrifuge, hepatic, nervine, stimulant, stomachic, sudorific, vasoconstrictor and vermifuge.

Its aroma is strongly piercing, refreshing, minty and very herbaceous. Among its properties are: Cooling, analgesic, antispasmodic, anesthetic, decongestant, emmenagogue, expectorant, febrifuge, insecticide and stimulant. Should be kept away from eyes, likely to irritate skin and mucous membranes. Best avoided by pregnant women and nursing mothers as it could discourage flow of milk. May antidote homeopathic remedies.

Helps people become clear headed and refreshes the spirits. Helpful for people who are unable to concentrate or who have mental fatigue. Said to relieve states of anger, hysteria and nervous trembling, excellent for depression.

On the body, it has a dual action: cooling when hot and warming when cold. As a remedy for colds, it halts mucous and fevers and encourages perspiration. Extremely important for its effect on the digestive system (1 drop on a sugar cube or on a teaspoon of honey).

Has a slightly anesthetic effect on stomach muscles. Good for travel sickness, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, colic, nausea and to keep drivers alert while on the road. Its cooling and pain relieving action seems to ease headaches, migraines and toothaches. Used in liniments for the relief of muscle pain, lumbago, bruises, joint pain and insect bites. Can be used to relieve any kind of skin irritation or itching but should be used in a dilution of 1% or less or the irritation could be made worse. Not much liked by insects and vermin, great for getting rid of ants and rodents. Blends well with cedarwood, cypress, lavender, niaouli and pine.

Health Benefits: Pain relief, induce numbness, protects from septic, reduces milk flow, reduces discharges, relaxes spasm, strengthens gums, stops hair fall, lifts skin, induce firmness in muscles, stops haemorrhage, removes gas, good for brain & memory, promotes bile discharge, warming, clears congestion & eases breathing, opens obstructed menstruations, expells phlegm & catarrh, reduces fever, good for liver, good for nerves, stimulates, good for stomach, promotes perspiration, contracts blood vessels, kills worms.

The health benefits of include its ability to treat indigestion, respiratory problems, headache, nausea, , stomach and bowel spasms and pain. Due to the presence of menthol, menthone and menthyl esters, peppermint and peppermint oil find wide applications in manufacture of soap, shampoo, cigarette, toothpaste, chewing gum, and ice cream

Safety Information: Tisserand and Young confirm that it is low risk as a mucous membrane irritant. Peppermint Oil is choleretic and can pose a risk of neurotoxicity. They recommend a maximum dermal use level of 5.4% and state that it should be avoided in instance of cardiac fibrillation and by those with a G6PD deficiency. Do not apply near the face of infants/children.

 

Aromatic Description: Minty, reminiscent of peppermint candies, but more concentrated. More fragrant than spearmint.