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Posted by on Dec 4, 2016 in Essential Oils, Essential Oils T-Z | 0 comments

Thyme Essential Oil

Thyme Essential Oil

Superbugs like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are on the rise and, unfortunately, are becoming resistant to the drugs used to treat them. When faced with a microbial infection, using natural antibacterial agents may not only be more effective but also safe and risk-free.

Apart from using spices like garlic, I recommend you try essential oils derived from herbs like thyme oil. Not only do they have antibacterial properties, but they also provide a number of health benefits. Before I go into thyme oil’s antimicrobial functions, let me share some information on the essential oil.

Oil of thyme is derived from thyme, also known as Thymus vulgaris. The perennial herb, a member of the mint family, is used in aromatherapy, cooking, potpourri, mouthwashes and elixirs, as well as in ointments. Thyme also has a number of medicinal properties, which is due to the herb’s essential oils.

This essential oil can cause skin irritation, yet has great value to help with concentration and to focus, as well as being an excellent bronchial and lung stimulant, making it valuable in bronchitis, coughs, colds, asthma and the like, while the warming qualities are great for rheumatism, sciatica, arthritis and gout.

3 drops of Thyme essential oil in a teaspoon of honey can stop a sore throat in it’s tracks! Take very 15 minutes until sore throat subsides.

Origin of thyme oil:

The benefits of thyme essential oil have been recognized for thousands of years in Mediterranean countries. This substance is also a common agent in Ayurverdic practice. Today, among the many producers of thyme oil, France, Morocco and Spain emerge as the primary countries bottling thyme oil.

It is an ancient herb used in medicine by the Greeks, the Egyptians and the Romans and is an evergreen perennial shrub that grows up to 45 cm (18 inches) high, with a woody root system, much-branched stem, small elliptical greenish gray aromatic leaves and pale purple or white flowers.

The name is derived from the Greek word ‘thymos’ that means ‘perfume’ and was used as an incense in Greek temples. The Egyptians used it in embalming process.

During the Middle Ages it was given to jousting knights for courage, and a sprig of the herb was carried into courtrooms to ward off diseases.

Therapeutic properties:

The therapeutic properties of thyme oil are antirheumatic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, bactericidal, bechic, cardiac, carminative, cicatrisant, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, hypertensive, insecticide, stimulant, tonic and vermifuge.

Uses:

Thyme oil strengthens the nerves, aids memory and concentration, can help with the feeling of exhaustion and combats depression, while it fortifies the lungs and helps with colds, coughs, asthma, laryngitis, sinusitis, catarrh, whooping cough, sore throats and tonsillitis.

Thyme oil is beneficial to boost the immune system and can help fight colds, flu, infectious diseases and chills and as a urinary antiseptic, it is very helpful for cystitis and urethritis.

The warming effect of this oil can help in cases of poor circulation, as well as for arthritis, rheumatism, gout, muscular aches and pains, sprains and sport injuries. It is also helpful for cellulite, anorexia, obesity and edema and in cases of scanty periods, leucorrhoea, and to speed up birth and to expel afterbirth.

 

Thyme oil can assist with nervous complaints, respiratory problems, poor circulation and problems of the digestive system and the urinary tract.

  • Burners and vaporizers
    • In vapor therapy, thyme oil can be helpful with bronchitis, coughs, respiratory problems, sinusitis, mucus congestion and muscular aches and pains.
  • Blended oil
    • As a blended massage oil it can assist with arthritis, bronchitis, colds, flu, coughs, gout, bruises, eczema, mucus congestion, muscular aches and pains, obesity and rheumatism.
  • Mouthwash and gargle
    • Diluted as a mouthwash or as a gargle, thyme oil can help with gum infections and tonsillitis.
  • Neat application
    • Apply directly, or used neat, thyme oil could help with animal bites and boils but use with care, because of the possible of the risk of skin irritation.

Precautions

It is a very potent oil and should not be used during pregnancy or in cases of high blood pressure. Because of the phenols (carvacrol and thymol), which can irritate mucus membranes and cause skin irritation, it should not be used for skin care products, and in general should be used in low concentrations.

When it is used in massage therapy, it would be a good idea to do a skin patch test to determine if the person is sensitive to it.

Note: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. They are for educational purposes only and are not intended to diagnose or treat any condition. Please consult your health care professional with any health-related concerns, and for diagnosis and treatment.

Fortunately, you can make infused thyme oil at home.It is not as powerful as the essentialoil but is great to have on hand:

What You Need:

  • 1/2 cup fresh thyme
  • 8 ounces carrier oil (ex. olive oil)
  • Mortar and pestle
  • Saucepan
  • Funnel
  • Glass container

Procedure:

  1. Wash the herbs and dry it by patting it with a clean cloth. You may also dry it in the sun or place it in a salad spinner.
  2. Crush the herbs using the mortar and pestle to release their natural oils.
  3. Place the crushed thyme and its oil into the saucepan, and place the carrier oil. Simmer this mixture over medium heat for at least five minutes or until it produces bubbles.
  4. Turn the heat off and allow the mixture to cool. Pour the mixture into the glass container then store in a cool place.